Coronavirus Update and Influenza Information

Information for Patients and General Public
Visit the Marshall Health website for coronavirus information for patients and the general public.

Budget update from President Gilbert (June 4, 2020)

Dear Marshall University faculty and staff,

I want to share with you some of our plans for addressing the financial challenges facing us beginning July 1 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The overriding goal of our recent efforts has been to avoid layoffs or employment terminations of permanent employees.

Following a month of hard work, the Budget Work Group presented me with a plan that included a number of measures to save Marshall close to $15 million, including salary reductions for employees making over a certain amount.

Upon review of their recommendations, I have put together a budget reduction proposal I will be presenting to our Board of Governors later this month. This proposal includes a scaled-back version of the salary reductions recommended by the Budget Work Group, along with about $12 million in other cost-saving measures.

If the board approves the proposal, beginning with the pay period that starts July 4, we will be implementing Part 1 of the temporary salary reductions, which is for employees making $100,000 or more annually. The reductions will be progressive, and employees who make more will have higher percentage reductions.

Here are some example data points on the Part 1 salary reduction scale:  6% reduction at $107,900; 7% reduction at $133,800; 8% reduction at $175,400; 9% reduction at $215,400; and 10% reduction at $262,400. The maximum reduction will be 15% at $470,000.

Affected employees can view tables of the specific adjusted salaries by logging into MyMU and clicking on the "My Pay" link.

After classes begin in August, we will examine our tuition revenue to determine whether or not additional salary reductions will be necessary. We hope further reductions will not be necessary, but if they are, we will implement Part 2 of the temporary salary reductions on Aug. 29 for employees whose annual salaries are in the range of $50,000 to $100,000.

Some example data points on the Part 2 salary reduction scale are: 1% reduction at $54,800; 2% reduction at $60,750; 3% reduction at $68,450; 4% reduction at $77,775; and 5% reduction at $90,000.

No employee with a salary below $50,000 will experience any salary reduction.

The Marshall University Research Corporation and the Marshall University Foundation will be following the same salary reduction levels and timelines for their employees, pending approval by their respective boards of directors.

In addition to these temporary salary reductions, we will be freezing vacant positions and State-funded travel; cutting back on campus events; reducing the number of graduate assistants and student workers; reducing operating, maintenance and utility budgets; and taking aggressive action in the academic programs to produce cost savings from course section management. In addition, we will save $1 million a year in reduced bond payments due to our strategic refinancing of university bonds, which took place in April.

Let me assure you it is our intent for the temporary salary reductions in Part 1 of the budget reduction plan (and in Part 2 if necessary) to last no longer than one year. It is possible salaries could be restored to their full levels at any time during the fiscal year, depending on university revenues. Vice President Mark Robinson and I will be closely monitoring our financial status to be prepared to take restorative action as soon as appropriate.

I appreciate the part that everyone has played in planning for and managing the impact of the pandemic on Marshall. These are extraordinarily difficult and trying times, and we must be braced for the likely financial shortfalls of the upcoming academic year.

Thank you for your service and commitment to Marshall University. 

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Campus notification regarding COVID-19 (June 3, 2020)

This message is notification that as part of the university’s established COVID-19 testing protocols for student-athletes returning to campus for voluntary workouts, one additional student-athlete has tested positive for the virus.

The student-athlete is asymptomatic, and the case is not believed to be related to the three cases announced Monday. University and public health officials do not believe any of the cases contracted the virus on campus.

There are test results pending for two additional student-athletes.

Officials with the Marshall University Office of Environmental Health and Safety, and Marshall Health physicians Dr. Larry Dial and Dr. John Jasko are working with Athletics Department staff to make sure all protocols are being followed.

These measures include:

  • All student-athletes arriving on campus are in mandatory self-isolation for one week;
  • Following the completion of the self-isolation period, all student-athletes are tested for COVID-19 and must return a confirmed negative result before being allowed out of self-isolation;
  • All Athletics Department employees who come in close contact with student-athletes are being tested; and
  • Any student-athlete returning a positive test is required to quarantine and follow positive test guidelines. A student-athlete who tests positive will be required to secure a negative test before completing the quarantine period.

The most recent student-athlete who tested positive is in quarantine, as are the three cases announced on Monday. The student-athlete’s close contacts are being identified and instructed to follow appropriate protocols, including quarantine or self-isolation, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Cabell Huntington Health Department. If you are not contacted, your risk of exposure from this student-athlete is low. 

Due to privacy regulations, the affected student-athlete’s name and other identifying information will not be released.

It is essential members of the university community continue to follow Centers for Disease Control guidelines for safety and health and the instructions in the university’s Return-to-Workplace Guide.

For the fall semester, a university Health and Safety Task Force is developing comprehensive procedures for classrooms, residence halls and dining facilities, and employee and student protection. The plan will address masks, testing and screening, hygiene, cleaning and sanitizing procedures, self-reporting of health status by students, social distancing, contact tracing, quarantine and isolation protocols, and other measures. As soon as the task force’s plan is finalized, it will be shared with the campus community.

The health and safety of employees and students continues to be Marshall University’s top priority. For university updates regarding COVID-19, please visit www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. Concerns and questions can be e-mailed to COVID19@marshall.edu.

Thank you for your cooperation and assistance.

Campus notification regarding COVID-19 (June 1, 2020)

This message is notification that as part of the university’s established COVID-19 testing protocols for student-athletes returning to campus for voluntary workouts, two student-athletes and one employee tested positive for the virus over the weekend.

All three are asymptomatic, and the cases are not believed to be related. University and public health officials do not believe any of the three contracted the virus on campus.

Officials with the Marshall University Office of Environmental Health and Safety, and Marshall Health physicians Dr. Larry Dial and Dr. John Jasko are working with Athletics Department staff to make sure all protocols are being followed.

These measures include:

  • All student-athletes arriving on campus are in mandatory self-isolation for one week;
  • Following the completion of the self-isolation period, all student-athletes are tested for COVID-19 and must return a confirmed negative result before being allowed out of self-isolation;
  • All Athletics Department employees who come in close contact with student-athletes are being tested; and
  • Any student-athlete returning a positive test is required to quarantine and follow positive test guidelines. A student-athlete who tests positive will be required to secure a negative test before completing the quarantine period.

The two student-athletes and the employee who tested positive are all in quarantine. Their close contacts are being identified and instructed to follow appropriate protocols, including quarantine or self-isolation, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Cabell Huntington Health Department. If you are not contacted, your risk of exposure from the student-athletes or the employee is low.

Due to privacy regulations, the affected student-athletes’ and employee’s names and other identifying information will not be released.

Other than these three cases and the two employees reported in April, the university has had no other confirmed cases of COVID-19 among employees, students in the residence halls or student-athletes.

It is essential members of the university community continue to follow Centers for Disease Control guidelines for safety and health and the instructions in the university’s Return-to-Workplace Guide.

For the fall semester, a university Health and Safety Task Force is developing comprehensive procedures for classrooms, residence halls and dining facilities, and employee and student protection. The plan will address masks, testing and screening, hygiene, cleaning and sanitizing procedures, self-reporting of health status by students, social distancing, contact tracing, quarantine and isolation protocols, and other measures. As soon as the task force’s plan is finalized, it will be shared with the campus community.

The health and safety of employees and students continues to be Marshall University’s top priority. For university updates regarding COVID-19, please visit www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. Concerns and questions can be e-mailed to COVID19@marshall.edu.

Thank you for your cooperation and assistance.

COVID-19 update from President Gilbert (May 29, 2020)

Dear Marshall University faculty and staff,

I am writing this afternoon to update you about several items related to the COVID-19 pandemic and our university.

Budget Situation

We project we will finish the current fiscal year on June 30 with an operating budget shortfall of $2-3 million, which we will make up for by tapping into our reserves. Overall, we were down this year $4.7 million in tuition and fees due to a decrease in enrollment, but were able to make up a good bit of it by a modest freeze on vacant positions and other cost-cutting measures.

As you well know, the pandemic is creating a lot of uncertainty about enrollment for the 2020-21 academic year. Our best-case scenario is likely an enrollment decrease of approximately 5%, based on our current deposits and the registrations of students returning for the fall. Our freshmen deposits are down about 8%, and experts suggest that because of fear, many students will not show up even if they "reserved a spot." National surveys are still predicting a 15% decrease in fall enrollment. The worst-case scenario would be if we have to go totally online for the fall, something that we will avoid if at all possible.

To prepare for both scenarios, in April I tasked a Budget Work Group made up of representatives of the student body, faculty and staff with identifying ways to make significant reductions to the university budget for the coming fiscal year. I asked them to find savings of $15-25 million and submit their recommendations to me no later than May 22.

I received the group’s recommendations last Thursday and am using their report to develop a proposed cost reduction plan I will be discussing with the university’s vice presidents and Board of Governors leadership early next week. Once the plan is finalized in mid-June, we will share it with all of you.

Based on what is happening at other universities in West Virginia and around the country, I know many of you are concerned about what these necessary cost reductions may mean for our employees. I want to assure you that one of my administration’s guiding principles, and one that the Budget Work Group took very seriously, is a commitment to doing everything we can to maintain the jobs of our permanent employees. At this time, we have no plans to lay off or terminate the employment of any permanent employees; however, these budget cuts will affect every department and every employee to some degree.

This is a difficult situation for all of us, and I was very pleased with the effort and thought the Budget Work Group directed toward their work in a relatively short period of time.

University Offices

Marshall staff members who have been telecommuting for the past couple of months due to the pandemic began returning to their offices this week. The Office of Environmental Health and Safety worked with Human Resource Services and Marshall Health experts to develop a phased-in plan to safely return employees to work on our campuses.

This week marked the start of Phase I, which will see approximately 25% of our staff return to their on-site workplaces. Phase II begins June 8. I returned to work in the office myself this week and am glad to be back.

Our Return-to-Workplace Guide is available to all employees as a downloadable PDF and is posted on the university’s website at www.marshall.edu/coronavirus.

Changes to the 2020-21 Academic Calendar

As I have previously communicated, we are planning to provide an on-campus experience for our students in the coming academic year, based on the public health trends and projections available to us at this time. As such, we are adjusting the university’s academic calendar to minimize travel to and from campus once the semesters begin, while maintaining the required number of instructional days.

Yesterday, the Faculty Senate approved revisions to the 2020-21 Academic Calendar. The highlights of the new calendar are as follows:

  • As planned, students will return to campus for in-person classes starting Aug. 24.
  • The Labor Day holiday on Sept. 7 will remain as originally scheduled, with no classes held.
  • After the Thanksgiving break in November, students will not return to campus, but will complete the semester with one week of online/distance instruction followed by one week of online final exams.
  • The spring term will be delayed by one week, and will start on Jan. 19.
  • The first four days of the originally scheduled Spring Break will be cancelled, and classes will be held to make up for the delayed start to the semester and to reduce high-risk travel/vacations; however, there will be no classes on Friday, March 19, to create a three-day weekend.
  • The spring semester will end face-to-face as scheduled on April 23, with final exams held April 26-30.

This revised calendar is in line with what many universities are doing, and I appreciate the Faculty Senate’s cooperation in this important matter.

Health and Safety Task Force

Tracy Smith, the university’s director of environmental health and safety is leading a small task force I appointed to coordinate our various COVID-19 related health and safety initiatives, with the goal of developing a comprehensive plan for the fall semester.

This Health and Safety Task Force will produce a draft plan in mid-June, including procedures for classrooms, office spaces, residence halls and dining facilities, and employee and student protection. The plan will address masks, testing and screening, hygiene, cleaning and sanitizing procedures, self-reporting of health status by students, social distancing, contact tracing, quarantine and isolation protocols, and other measures.

As soon as the task force’s plan is finalized, we will share it with the campus community.

Please stay healthy and safe. I will continue to keep you updated.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Return-to-Workplace Guide now available for all employees (May 15, 2020)

As referenced in the May 4 e-mail to all employees, the Office of Environmental Health and Safety has worked with Human Resource Services and Marshall Health experts to develop a phased-in plan to safely return employees to work on our campuses.

A draft of the plan was shared with supervisors in a virtual meeting yesterday, and each unit has been charged with developing a strategy to gradually return employees over a period of several weeks. As these unit strategies are developed and approved, your unit’s leadership will be sharing the details with you.

The updated Return-to-Workplace Guide is now available to all employees as a downloadable PDF.

We encourage you to review the guide carefully, as it contains specific instructions regarding face masks, physical distancing, disinfecting procedures, etc.

If you have questions or comments about plans for returning to work on site, please contact ReturnToWork@marshall.edu.

Message from President Gilbert: Deadline extended for requesting CARES Act funds (May 7, 2020)

Dear Students,

As we announced last week, Marshall has received federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act funding to award to eligible students during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

As of this morning, only a little more than 25% of eligible Marshall students had requested funds from this program. As a result, we have extended the priority deadline for students to request a grant to 5 p.m. next Thursday, May 14.

I want to emphasize that this money does not have to be paid back; it is not a loan. Examples of the types of situations the funding is intended to assist with include the following:

  • Job loss or reduction of income (including reduced hours at work) in the student’s household;
  • Temporary furlough (i.e., the student or a member of the household has not lost their job, but their position has been temporarily put on hold);
  • Medical including support needed for accessibility purposes);
  • Costs related to the transition to online learning; and
  • Travel or moving expenses to return home due to the transition to online learning.

Our online application process is simple and should take no more than a few minutes to complete. When you log in with your 901 number, the application will tell you if you do not meet the criteria—before you even start the form.

I encourage all our students to carefully review this opportunity for assistance, as many, if not most, will qualify.

You can request $500 and receive an answer within just a few business days. If you need more than $500, you may be asked to provide additional information and the review process may take up to two additional weeks.

Students who have already applied and qualified for these grants will begin receiving their money in the next several days. Students who have direct deposit should have their funds in the next 1-3 business days, while paper checks may take 5-10 business days.

Remember, these grants are separate from the previously announced financial assistance for unused housing/meal plans, and Rec Center and parking fees. No application was needed to receive those funds, which have already been transferred to student accounts.

Best wishes for a wonderful summer. We look forward to seeing those of you who did not graduate back again with us in the fall!

Stay safe.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Message from President Gilbert: CARES Act emergency student grants now available (April 30, 2020)

Dear Marshall University community,

I am pleased to announce we have received the federal CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security) Act funds and have opened up the application process for emergency financial assistance grants to students.

The grants are intended for students who have experienced economic hardships created by the COVID-19 pandemic, including one or more of the following situations:

  • Job loss or reduction of income (including reduced hours at work) for the household;
  • Temporary furlough (you or a member of your household have not lost your job, but your position has been temporarily put on hold);
  • Medical (including additional support needed for accessibility purposes);
  • Additional costs related to the transition to online learning; or
  • Travel or moving expenses to return home due to the transition to online learning.

The funds may be used to cover the following expenses:

  • Housing;
  • Food;
  • Utilities;
  • Course materials;
  • Child care;
  • Technology or other resources needed for online coursework;
  • Medical expenses (including additional support needed for accessibility purposes);
  • Travel or moving expenses for returning home due to the transition to online learning

The base grant amount of $500 will be awarded to eligible students upon receipt of a completed, accepted application by the priority deadline. Students who request more than $500 will be required to provide additional information and documentation. Review and processing requirements for the larger grants could take up to two additional weeks.

Eligibility

The CARES Act requires students who receive the grants to meet Title IV federal financial aid eligibility requirements, as determined by a completed FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) for the 2019-20 academic year.

According to guidance provided by the U.S. Department of Education, you also cannot have been enrolled in all-online courses for the spring 2020 semester before COVID-19 forced all classes online.

To be eligible for the grants, you must meet the following requirements:

  • Filed a FAFSA for the current 2019-2020 academic year;
  • Not enrolled as a Distance Learning student (i.e., no face-to-face classes) for the spring 2020 semester before COVID-19;
  • Have a valid social security number;
  • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen;
  • If male, be registered for U.S. Selective Service;
  • Have a high school diploma or GED or have completed high school in an approved homeschool setting;
  • Making satisfactory academic progress;
  • Not in default on a federal student loan; and
  • Have been enrolled at Marshall for the spring 2020 semester as an undergraduate or graduate (including doctorate-professional practice) degree-seeking student, and be enrolled in one or more classes creditable toward a degree.

Application Link and Deadline

For priority consideration, students should complete and submit the MU CARES Act Emergency Grant Application before 5 p.m. ET on Thursday, May 14, 2020 (the previous deadline was May 7, but has been extended to May 14). Applications received after that date may be considered if funds are still available.

Please note that these grants are separate from the previously announced financial assistance for unused housing/meal plans, and Rec Center and parking fees. No application was needed to receive those funds, which are being transferred to student accounts this week.

Best wishes for the end of your semester and a wonderful summer. We look forward to seeing those of you who are not graduating back with us in the fall!

Stay safe.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Message from President Gilbert: Marshall University’s present and future (April 27, 2020)

Dear Marshall University community,

Let me start by saying how incredibly proud I am to be your president, now perhaps even more than ever.

Over the past weeks, I have repeatedly been awed, inspired and almost brought to tears by the dedication to our educational mission by our faculty and staff, the acts of kindness and generosity by our students and employees, and the commitment to our community’s safety and wellbeing by every member of the Marshall family.

As I wrote in a column for The Parthenon last week, I know our world is forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic—in some ways for the better, although it may be hard to see that right now. I also know we all have questions that cannot be completely answered quite yet.

What will next academic year look like? (More on this in a minute.) Will we be able to gather 1,800 freshmen around the John Marshall statue for the traditional class photograph in August? Will we have football in the fall? Will we all be able to participate in traditional programs like Freshman Convocation and Commencement, with large numbers of people in the audience?

We will all know much more in the coming weeks and months, as incidences of the virus hopefully continue to decline and our communities start opening back up.

In the meantime, we must keep hope alive. Here are just a few of the things keeping hope alive for me right now:

  • Our faculty and students have taken the transition to distance learning head on and, for the most part, made it work. It has been difficult, I know, but we have adapted and will get through this semester.
  • Dr. Suzanne Strait from Biological Sciences, along with her West Virginia Mask Army, as well as a number of our theatre students, have sewn thousands of cloth masks for health care workers.
  • When our community’s first responders were having trouble finding supplies, our School of Pharmacy made and bottled hand sanitizer for them.
  • Our research laboratories generously gathered up their stocks of masks, gowns and other personal protective equipment and sent it to local hospitals.
  • Marshall scientists addressed a state-wide shortage of the solution used to transport testing swabs by making the mixture in one of our labs.
  • Our Robert C. Byrd Institute (RCBI) led the state’s efforts to 3D print N95 masks for use by health care providers.
  • Dr. Marianne Linz, chair of our Psychology department, was a driving force in putting together the inspirational Huntington COVID-19 Care Plan to help the most vulnerable in our local population.

There are many, many more examples of how the Marshall family has stepped up time after time to take care of one another, their neighbors and their communities. Thank you all for everything you have done and will do as we continue to face obstacles on the path to our new normal.

Fall 2020 Semester

We know our students and their families place great value on the personal approach we offer at Marshall, and we are working steadily toward safely and responsibly providing an on-campus academic experience for our students in the fall. Given the trends and projections available to us today, we believe that modifications to the fall semester—such as creative class scheduling and other social distancing strategies—can make that possible.

Provost Jaime Taylor is coordinating with the deans and our campus health/safety experts to develop academic and student life plans for the fall. We will be sharing more information as their plans are finalized, but I wanted you to know that at this time, we are committed to having as close to a normal fall semester for our students as we possibly can.

Campus Offices

We are also starting to plan for a re-opening of campus offices, although we are likely a few weeks away from taking that step. Our Office of Environmental Health and Safety is working with Human Resource Services and Marshall Health’s chief medical officer to develop a comprehensive plan that we will share with all employees as soon as it is finalized. In the meantime, offices will continue to operate remotely and staff will continue to telecommute until further notice.

Budget Challenges

Due to the pandemic and the related uncertainty regarding enrollment, financial markets and other factors, we know we face a multimillion-dollar budget hole in the fall. Universities across the country are grappling with these same issues, so we are certainly not alone.

Most national higher education surveys are predicting a possible decrease in enrollment as families navigate the financial hardships associated with this crisis. We will continue to work diligently to ensure that a Marshall education is affordable and attainable, but we must face the possibility of a decrease in the tuition revenue that funds Marshall University—lower enrollment means less money to support our operations. It’s as simple as that.

Add in the unknowns about college athletics, interest earnings on our endowment and possible effects of the economic downturn on our donors, and it becomes clear we have some great challenges still ahead. While we are in one of the strongest financial positions of any public higher education institution in West Virginia, we must prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

With this in mind, I have already put the following actions into motion:

  • I have asked Chief Financial Officer Mark Robinson to convene a budget work group made up of representatives of the student body, the faculty and the staff. The group will begin meeting virtually on Tuesday to help identify ways to make significant reductions to the university budget for the coming year. I am sorry to say that these cuts will be deep and they will be painful. I have charged the group with identifying savings of $15-25 million. Nothing is off the table, so if you have ideas, I urge you to complete our online form. All submissions will be forwarded to the university’s leadership team for consideration.
  • We have put a hard freeze on all hiring of faculty and staff until further notice. Senior leadership is reviewing positions currently posted to decide which are critical to university operations and which can wait.
  • We have placed a hold on all state-funded travel for the next year.
  • Athletics leadership is planning for significant budget reductions next year. There is considerable uncertainty right now about the future of intercollegiate athletics at all levels, so they will need to be proactive about managing their budget, too. Reorganization and reductions will be necessary in Athletics just as they will be in the rest of the university’s operations.
  • Beginning June 1 and extending for up to one year, Provost Taylor and I are taking voluntary pay cuts of 10% and 15%, respectively. Everyone at Marshall will have to make sacrifices in the coming months and, as two of the university’s highest-paid administrators, we wanted the savings to start with us.

Marshall University has been through even tougher times than this, and we have a history of perseverance. Although the short term may be challenging, I am certain we will come out much stronger for the future.

Please stay safe and healthy. I look forward to when we can all be together again.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Emergency financial assistance grants to students affected by COVID-19 (April 20, 2020)

Dear Marshall University students,

Marshall University expects to receive federal stimulus funds from the U.S. Department of Education to provide emergency financial assistance for our students who have economic hardships created by the COVID-19 pandemic.

While we have not yet received the stimulus funds, we are finalizing details of an application process so we can roll out the program quickly once the funds do arrive. We anticipate beginning to accept online applications for direct cash grants later this week or early next week, based on Department of Education funding and guidance. The university is committed to providing assistance as quickly as possible to our students who are struggling to make ends meet during this challenging time, and anticipate that application requirements will include information regarding specific needs and simple supporting documentation.

These grants of up to $1,000 are intended to help current Marshall students with personal or family situations that meet the following criteria:

  • Reduction in personal or family household income due to job loss, reduced work hours or temporary furlough;
  • Costs related to the transition to online learning;
  • Medical expenses; or
  • Travel or moving expenses to return home due to the transition to online learning.

These grants are separate from the previously announced financial assistance to students for unused housing/meal plans, and Rec Center and parking fees. No application is needed to receive those funds and it is still the university’s intention to have credits available in student accounts by April 29.

In addition, as announced last week, we are also providing all students who register for summer school with emergency assistance funds to offset the e-delivery fee of $120 for a three-hour course. There is no application for these funds, either. When students register for summer session courses, the university will automatically apply $40 per credit hour to their accounts to cancel out the e-delivery fees.

Please continue to monitor your Marshall e-mail account. Once we have received the stimulus funds from the federal government, we will send you grant application details and deadlines.

I hope you and your families are safe and well.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Message from the Provost: All four summer school sessions to be held online; financial assistance to be provided to offset e-delivery fees (April 15, 2020)

Dear Marshall students, faculty and staff,

As we continue to navigate the uncertainty presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, I want to thank members of our university community for your patience and cooperation. I am inspired and motivated by the response the Marshall family has had to every challenge that has been placed before it over the last several weeks.

This message is to update you about the plans for our Summer 2020 sessions. Several weeks ago, we announced that both of the first two sessions—Intersession and Session I—would be offered via distance delivery only. Because we still don’t know how long there will be a need for physical distancing, we have now decided to move all summer courses to a distance format and provide students with emergency assistance funds* to offset the e-delivery fee of $40 per credit hour, or $120 for a three-hour course.

The only courses that will be offered during summer school are those that can be delivered all-online, as well as those that include some synchronous activities delivered electronically with no personal contact (i.e., hybrid courses).

With the financial assistance funds from the university and no Rec Center fees since the facility is closed, this summer is a great opportunity for students to take required classes at a reduced price. For example, the base tuition and fees for in-state undergraduate students for Summer 2020 will be reduced to $333.50 per credit hour from $373.50. The base tuition and fees for in-state graduate students will be $462.25 per credit hour, down from $502.25.

These changes affect courses in all four summer sessions—Intersession (May 11-June 5), Session I (May 18-Aug. 7), Session II (June 8-July 10) and Session III (July 14-Aug. 14).

The Division of Academic Affairs is working with academic leadership to determine which summer courses originally planned for face-to-face instruction can be transitioned to a distance format. Summer courses originally scheduled for online delivery will be offered as planned.

The following is specific, related information for students and faculty members:

For Students

We are continuing to update the online summer class schedule to reflect changes to course offerings. The updated Summer 2020 schedule will be available in MyMU. We encourage you to check back frequently, as we expect additional changes over the coming weeks.

Students should contact their advisors for assistance and advice regarding summer school registration. Help is available on our Keep Learning page, which includes advisor contact information and other resources for the online learning environment.

For Faculty

Faculty who need assistance identifying the best methods to convert a face-to-face course to an online or hybrid format should contact the Online Learning and Instructional Design Center and the Center for Teaching and Learning. Our Keep Teaching page also has guidance especially for faculty members.

Please remember that your Marshall e-mail is the primary way for us to communicate with you, so please check it regularly.

Thank you again for your understanding during this challenging time.

Sincerely,
Jaime R. Taylor, Ph.D.
Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

* When students register for summer session courses, Marshall University will automatically apply a $40 per credit hour emergency financial assistance grant to their accounts. The grants will cancel out all e-delivery fees.

Campus notification regarding COVID-19 (April 13, 2020)

This message is notification that a second Marshall University employee has been diagnosed with COVID-19. The second employee, who began experiencing symptoms on April 4, is currently in self-isolation at home.

Due to privacy regulations, the affected employee’s name and other identifying information will not be released. University administrators are in contact with the employee and are providing assistance and support as needed.

It is not believed the individual contracted the virus on campus, as the employee has been telecommuting since March 20 and has not returned to Marshall since that time. The employee’s close contacts have been identified and instructed to follow appropriate protocols, including self-isolation, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Cabell Huntington Health Department. If you have not been contacted, your risk of exposure from this employee is low.

Another employee, who was identified as the university’s first known case last week, has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home.

Other than these two employees reported to date, we have had no other confirmed cases of COVID-19 among our employees or the students who remain in our residence halls. Please review the university’s Infectious Disease Preparedness Plan for information regarding established protocols.

As of this morning, 22 cases have been reported in Cabell County out of 626 statewide.

It is essential members of the university community continue to follow Centers for Disease Control guidelines for safety and health.

Keep social distancing, wash hands and stay home as directed by government authorities.

The health and safety of employees and students continues to be Marshall University’s top priority. For university updates regarding COVID-19, please visit www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. Concerns and questions can be e-mailed to COVID19@marshall.edu.

Thank you for your cooperation and assistance during this ongoing situation.

Message regarding unused housing and meal plans, parking permits and Rec Center student fees (April 8, 2020)

Dear Marshall University students,

As you know, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and the change to remote learning through the end of the spring semester made it necessary for most of our students to leave campus early. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we respond to the unprecedented and ever-evolving challenges we all are facing.

I am writing today to give you information about how Marshall will be providing emergency financial assistance to students to help compensate them for the disruption to university services. This means we will be crediting the accounts of eligible students* for unused room and board plans, as well as prorated amounts for parking and Rec Center student fees.

Tuition will not be prorated. While the modes of delivery have changed, instruction is still being delivered, and semester hours are still being earned and awarded.

The student emergency financial assistance will be calculated as follows:

Housing Contracts

  • Students with housing contracts, and who did not remain on campus for the remote-learning period, will receive an amount equal to 37.5%** of their spring semester housing charges.

Meal Plans/FLEX

  • Students who have unlimited meal plans, and who did not remain on campus for the remote-learning period, will receive an amount equal to 37.5%** of their spring semester meal plan charges.
  • Students with other meal plan types, and who did not remain on campus for the remote-learning period, will receive an amount equal to the unused meals in the student’s account.
  • All students with FLEX dollars, and who did not remain on campus for the remote-learning period, will receive an amount equal to the balance in the student’s account.
  • Meal plans for students who did remain on campus for the remote-learning period will remain active through the end of the spring semester. At that time, they will receive an amount equal to the balance of FLEX dollars in their account.

Parking Permits

  • Students who purchased parking permits for the spring 2020 semester, and who did not remain on campus for the remote-learning period, will receive an amount equal to 37.5%** of the spring permit cost.

Recreation Center Student Fees

  • All eligible students will receive an amount equal to 37.5%** of their spring Rec Center student fees.

Our goal is to have all credits available in student accounts by April 29. If that date changes, we will let you know.

To prevent possible delays in receiving your funds, please be sure to set up a refund preference using your student account e-Refund profile, and verify your permanent address and phone number are accurate and active in myMU no later than April 20, 2020. If you do not select a refund profile by that date, a paper check will be mailed to the permanent address in your records.

Please note that the quickest way to receive a refund is to select the direct deposit option in e-Refund using an existing bank account. We recommend you verify your ABA routing number and bank account number with your banking institution before selecting the direct deposit option.

We understand you may have questions about this process. Please submit inquiries to bursar@marshall.edu, and a university representative will respond as quickly as possible. We appreciate your patience as we work to respond to each message.

Even after these adjustments to your accounts, I know many of you may still have unmet needs. The Marshall University Foundation has a Student Emergency Fund to which many of our loyal alumni and supporters have generously contributed. To apply for assistance from this fund, please contact Michelle Biggs, Assistant Dean, of the Division of Student Affairs.

Best wishes for the remainder of the semester. I look forward to the day when our world and our university will return to normal.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

 

* Students unaffected by the change to remote learning—including those who originally registered for the spring 2020 semester as Distance Students (i.e., completely on-line) and high school students taking Marshall classes in their schools—will not receive emergency financial assistance.

Students who remained on campus to live in university residence halls during the remote-learning period are not eligible for emergency financial assistance for housing, meal plans or parking.

Students with housing contracts in Fairfield Landing were not required to leave their apartments, so they are not eligible to receive emergency financial assistance for housing.

Students who completely withdrew from the university before the change to remote learning are not eligible to receive emergency financial assistance.

Students who had a third party that paid for their residence hall room and/or dining plan are not eligible to receive emergency financial assistance for those contracts (i.e., full scholarship athletes, international sponsorships, etc.).

** 37.5% = 6/16 for the 6 weeks of the 16-week spring semester impacted by the pandemic

Campus notification regarding COVID-19 (April 7, 2020)

This message is notification that a Marshall University employee has been diagnosed with COVID-19. The employee is currently hospitalized in stable condition.

Due to privacy regulations, the affected employee’s name and other identifying information will not be released. It is believed the individual was exposed to the virus through a family member—not a co-worker. University administrators are in contact with the employee and are providing assistance and support as needed.

The employee has been working at home since March 26. All the employee’s close contacts at the university prior to that date have been identified and instructed to follow appropriate protocols, including self-isolation, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Cabell Huntington Health Department. If you have not been contacted, your risk of exposure from this employee is low.

We have had no other confirmed cases of COVID-19 among our employees or the students who remain in our residence halls. Please review the university’s Infectious Disease Preparedness Plan for information regarding established protocols.

As of today, 11 cases have been reported in Cabell County out of 412 statewide.

It is essential members of the university community continue to follow Centers for Disease Control guidelines for safety and health. Keep social distancing, wash hands and stay home as directed by government authorities.

The health and safety of employees and students is Marshall University’s top priority. The university is optimistic its efforts to reduce the incidence of COVID-19, including moving all classes to remote delivery and having nearly 90% of its workforce telecommuting, will be effective.

For university updates regarding COVID-19, please visit www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. Concerns and questions can be e-mailed to coronavirus@marshall.edu.

Thank you for your cooperation and assistance during this ongoing situation.

Message from the provost: Addition of Credit/No Credit grading option for spring semester (April 1, 2020)

Dear Marshall University students,

Due to the emerging hardships associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and the necessary transition to online course delivery, Marshall University is making changes to its grading system for the spring semester.

For this semester only, undergraduate students will be able to opt in to receive Credit/No Credit (CR/NC) grades based on their final grades as of May 4. CR/NC is an alternative to the traditional A-F grading system.

You must opt in to CR/NC grading no later than 5 p.m. Friday, April 24, and may do so on a course-by-course basis. Instructions for the opt in process are forthcoming.

Some important points to remember include:

  • Students who select CR/NC are required to participate in all course activities and assessments through the end of the semester.
  • To earn CR for a course, you must receive a final letter grade of A, B or C; students who receive a final grade of D or F will earn NC.
  • Only CR grades count as credit toward graduation.
  • CR/NC grades will not affect your term or cumulative grade point average either positively or negatively.

You should talk to your academic advisor before making a decision. Please note:

  • The CR/NC grading option may not be appropriate for all courses in accredited programs, for courses associated with professional licensure or for courses requiring clinical/practicum clock-hours. Each academic college will administer exceptions to this policy as necessary.
  • You may need letter grades in certain prerequisite courses to meet admission requirements for professional graduate programs.
  • A final letter grade of D counts as credit toward graduation. For students who opt in under this policy, however, a final grade of D will be converted to NC and will not count as credit toward graduation.
  • For undergraduate students who are repeating a course under the D/F repeat rule and who opt to receive CR/NC grading, the CR or NC will replace the D/F grade from the previous attempt. If the earlier grade to be replaced is a D, an NC would trigger a reduction in total credits earned.

We hope this change to our grading policy provides the flexibility you need to feel more comfortable proceeding with your education during this particularly challenging time.

Please remember to check your Marshall e-mail regularly for updates, and thank you again for your patience and understanding.

Sincerely,
Jaime R. Taylor, Ph.D.
Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Message from the provost regarding changes to summer Intersession and Session I (March 31, 2020)

Dear Marshall students, faculty and staff,

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have decided to make some changes to the plans for Intersession and Session I of summer school, which begin May 11 and May 18 respectively.

The only courses we will be offering during those first two sessions of summer school are those that can be delivered all-online, as well as those that include some synchronous activities delivered electronically with no personal contact (i.e., hybrid courses).

This decision was made in consideration of the health and welfare of our university community. While we don’t yet know how long there will be a need for physical distancing, we wanted to make this announcement now to give our faculty and students time to adjust their plans.

Faculty who need assistance in identifying the best methods to convert a face-to-face course to an online or hybrid format should contact the Online Learning and Instructional Design Center and the Center for Teaching and Learning.

The university is updating the summer class schedule to reflect this information and any changes to class offerings for the summer term. The updated Summer 2020 class schedule will be available in MyMU. Due to these changes to the summer class schedule, we encourage you to check back frequently, as we expect there may be additional changes over the next several weeks.

A decision has not been made yet regarding Summer II (June 8-July 9) and Summer III sessions (July 14-Aug. 13).

Please remember to check your Marshall e-mail regularly, as it is the primary way for the university to communicate with you.

We thank you in advance for your patience and understanding during this challenging time.

Sincerely,

Jaime R. Taylor, Ph.D.

Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

Required campus notification regarding COVID-19 (March 30, 2020)

This information is being released in accordance with the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act).

Dear Marshall University community,

The health, safety and well-being of everyone at Marshall University is our top priority.

With that concern at the foundation of every decision we make, I am writing to inform you of recent events relative to the new coronavirus, COVID-19, and to remind you of the necessity of social distancing.

For the last several weeks, we’ve provided you with updates and support in the form of e-mails, text messages, videos, and social media and website posts about our university’s response to—and preparedness for—COVID-19. The latest information about Marshall and the virus can be found at www.marshall.edu/coronavirus>. The site is updated on a regular basis.

Further, concerns and questions can be forwarded to coronavirus@marshall.edu. University administrators are continually monitoring that inbox to respond as quickly and comprehensively as possible to our community’s questions, concerns and suggestions.

This one-time communication is part of a federally required safety notification related to COVID-19.

Through reports to our emergency management structure and the health care protocols we have established, we have had no confirmed cases of COVID-19 among our students or employees. Please review our Infectious Disease Preparedness Plan for information regarding established protocols to be used in the event a case is identified on campus.

Given that we operate an academic medical center, which is also one of the state’s largest health care providers, our physicians and other health care providers are leading efforts to screen, test and treat potential COVID-19 patients. To date, one case has been reported in Cabell County out of 124 statewide as of yesterday.

Last week, we asked all students who were able to move out of the residence halls to return to their permanent residences or to make alternative housing arrangements to continue their studies remotely. Students who remain—because they cannot travel home—are being housed in individual rooms in residence halls on the east end of campus, where they can be supported.

Social distancing is the most important health measure we can take as a community to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Social distancing saves lives.

Here are some tips to ensure appropriate social distancing measures:

What is social distancing?

Social distancing is the practice of avoiding large crowds or, if you have to be around others, keeping a distance of at least six feet.

What does social distancing do?

It helps to slow the spread of an outbreak and is currently recommended for people of all ages.

How does it slow the spread of the virus?

COVID-19 is spread through person-to-person contact and the respiratory droplets produced when a person coughs or sneezes. If you put space between yourself and others, you are less likely to become infected or spread it yourself.

What should I be doing?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is constantly updating its guidance on social distancing. To be certain you are getting up-to-date information, you should continuously check their website at cdc.gov. It is also important to stay in tune with the precautions your federal, state and local governments are taking to keep you safe. Visit coronavirus.wv.gov for more information.

Recognize that COVID-19 is spread mainly through respiratory droplets that can suspend in air for a period of time, and to contain all respiratory secretions with tissue and then immediately discard and sanitize hands.

Frequent HANDWASHING with warm water and soap for at least 20 seconds is the most effective way to prevent spread of disease, infection and viruses.

If handwashing is not readily available, utilize hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol based.

How is social distancing different from self-quarantine or self-isolation?

Social distancing is maintaining a safe distance from others. Self-quarantining keeps someone who doesn’t have symptoms but was exposed to the virus away from others, so they don’t unknowingly infect anyone else. Health experts recommend that self-quarantine last 14 days. This provides enough time for them to know whether or not they will become ill and be contagious to other people.

Self-isolation keeps people who are confirmed to have COVID-19 away from those who are not infected. Self-isolation takes place in one’s home, but can also take place at a hospital or other care facility.

Thank you for your attention to these issues and for your commitment to the health and safety of everyone in our Marshall family.

Please continue to monitor your university e-mail account for updates.

Sincerely,

James E. Terry
Chief, Marshall University Police Department
Director of Public Safety

Message from President Gilbert (March 19, 2020)

Dear Marshall University students, faculty and staff,

Thank you all for your cooperation and patience as we have dealt with the rapidly changing COVID-19 pandemic and the challenges it has created. The safety and security of our university family and our communities continues to be our highest priority.

With that in mind, we are making some additional changes to university operations, as follows:

  • Instruction will be held exclusively online or through other alternative learning formats through the end of the spring 2020 semester (we previously had announced using such formats through at least April 13). We will be communicating with faculty, students and their families about how we can support them as we transition to online instruction for the remainder of this semester.
  • Because we will not be resuming in-person instruction this semester, residence hall students who can return to their permanent residences or make alternative housing arrangements to continue their studies remotely should make plans to do so as soon as possible. Exceptions can be made for students who cannot return home (i.e., international students, those who do not have anywhere else to go, those who have elderly relatives at home, etc.). Students who need to stay on campus should complete the online Housing Extended Stay Request Form. Students who have left campus will not be permitted to return to retrieve their belongings until they receive instructions from the university, which will be forthcoming soon. Students who live in residence halls will receive specific instructions regarding when they will be allowed to return to campus to retrieve their belongings. Students must follow those instructions carefully to allow us to manage the number of people in the halls and to practice appropriate social distancing.
  • In keeping with the Centers for Disease Control recommendation not to hold large gatherings for the next eight weeks, we are postponing the May 2, 2020, commencement exercises. This decision was made out of concern for the health and safety of our students and their families; as well as that of our staff and faculty who participate. There will be a commencement to celebrate our spring 2020 graduating class; and we will schedule it for a time when we are able to do so in a healthy and safe environment. We will communicate as soon as details are worked out to ensure everyone involved can make travel plans. This decision does not change the semester completion date for our students, nor does it affect the timeline for students earning their degrees. We are only postponing the graduation ceremony and public celebration.
  • Tuition refunds will not be offered. While the modes of delivery have changed, instruction is still being delivered and semester hours are still being earned and awarded. For students in university residence halls, and for those with meal plans, we intend to provide some type of prorated credit, pending approval by the university’s Board of Governors. Details are still being worked out and eligible students will be contacted by the end of April.
  • Marshall University will remain open, with minimal staff on site to ensure safety and continuity of essential services. We want to make certain our faculty, staff and students are safe, that we do our part to help stem the spread of the virus, and that we fulfill our mission to graduate our students, even in the face of these challenging times.

Additional information about COVID-19 and the university’s response is available at www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. Students and employees can e-mail COVID19@marshall.edu with questions about general university procedures related to the virus or these changes to university operations.

For health-related concerns, students should contact Student Health Services at 304-691-1100. Faculty and staff should call their primary care provider.

Marshall Health has set up a dedicated phone line at 304-696-2900 for the general public, particularly for patients who think they may have been exposed to the virus. The line is staffed by healthcare professionals from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Please continue to monitor your e-mail and the website for updates and, if you haven’t already done so, enroll in the university’s MU Alert System.

Thank you again for your patience and understanding as we navigate these difficult times.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

Message from President Gilbert (March 11, 2020)

Photo of Marshall University President Jerome A. GilbertAfter careful consideration of the implications of the possible spread of COVID-19 and its impact on our students and their families, I have decided to alter the university calendar.

Our task force of senior leadership and subject matter experts are conferring around the clock, focused on our university’s preparations and response. We have been monitoring developments closely and providing regular updates to you as the rapidly changing situation evolves. We have no greater responsibility than the safety and security of our university community and the community at large.

To protect our university community, and to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in our community at large, we have decided to institute the following measures:

  • Marshall will suspend in-person classes next week—March 16-20—to allow our faculty to prepare for altered course delivery following Spring Break.
  • The week of suspended classes will be followed by the scheduled Spring Break March 23-27.
  • Beginning Monday, March 30, all class instruction will be delivered non-face-to-face. These distance methods will vary from class to class, and may include online, e-mail or other means.
  • Students will receive information from their instructors about how to access instruction remotely.
  • Faculty will use March 16-20 to prepare their classes for remote delivery. Later this week, all faculty will receive information from the Office of Academic Affairs about next steps.
  • Regular, online-only classes are not suspended and will continue as scheduled March 16-20.
  • It is anticipated the university will return to normal academic operations on April 13, or when university officials determine it is safe to resume in-person instruction. Please monitor your e-mail for updates.
  • While completing classes virtually, students may choose to remain home after Spring Break or return to campus, where appropriate social distancing and enhanced preventative public health and hygiene measures will be actively encouraged. Students who decide to stay at home should be sure to take textbooks, course materials, laptops, tablets and critical personal items with them when they leave.
  • For students who elect to remain on campus, residence halls will be open and food service options will be available.
  • The university will remain open and operational. Employees are expected to report to work, practicing social distancing and preventative hygiene measures.
  • Classroom experiences such as laboratory and performance classes are being evaluated and the university will provide specific guidance in the coming days.
  • Health sciences students who are involved in clinical rotations and clinical work will receive further direction from health sciences leadership and deans. Information about labs, testing and other items will be provided.
  • All university-sponsored international travel continues to be suspended until further notice. If you are traveling internationally for either business or personal reasons, please complete the online International Travel Registration Form so we can monitor our travel footprint. University-sponsored domestic travel is being evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Additional information about COVID-19 and the university’s response is available at www.marshall.edu/coronavirus. We have also set up an e-mail address, COVID19@marshall.edu, for students or employees who have questions about general university procedures related to the virus or these changes to the university calendar.

For health-related concerns, students should contact Student Health Services at 304-691-1100.

Marshall Health has set up a dedicated phone line at 304-696-2900 for the general public, particularly for patients who think they may have been exposed to the virus. The line is staffed by healthcare professionals from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Please continue to monitor your e-mail and the website for updates and, if you haven’t already done so, enroll in the university’s MU Alert System.

Sincerely,
Jerome A. Gilbert, Ph.D.
President

COVID-19 Update (March 10, 2020)

Marshall University officials are continuing to closely monitor the public health situation related to the coronavirus COVID-19. Although no cases have been confirmed in West Virginia, the university is actively preparing should the virus begin to affect the institution and community.

Marshall University and Marshall Health officials have attended COVID-19 briefings with the Cabell-Huntington Health Department, the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department, the Department of Homeland Security and the State of West Virginia.

Marshall’s Office of Environmental Health and Safety is coordinating the university’s response to the outbreak in accordance with the Infectious Disease Preparedness Plan. University leadership is meeting frequently to review the plan.

Marshall University has an emergency management system that includes many different scenarios, including dealing with a communicable disease outbreak. In the event COVID-19 escalates to a higher risk for our community, the emergency management system will be implemented. To follow public safety and emergency announcements from Marshall University, students, faculty and staff are encouraged to enroll in the MU Alert system.

More information about COVID-19, its symptoms, common forms of transmission and preventative steps is available from the Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization.

University Travel and Mandatory Travel Registry

  • Given the escalation of the outbreak internationally, Marshall University has decided to cancel all university-sponsored international travel through April 30. The situation will be reassessed at that time and a decision made regarding future travel. This decision was made in response to guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and in consultation with the university’s chief medical officer.
  • As Spring Break approaches, students, faculty and staff who have plans to travel either internationally OR to affected areas in the U.S. are strongly urged to reconsider their travel. Please take into account the possibility of travel delays, future quarantines, or prolonged self-isolation when returning to Marshall University and our community.
  • For members of the Marshall community who do travel internationally, the university has created a mandatory international travel registry. Effective immediately and until further notice, all international travelers must register personal as well as professional travel. This applies to travelers who are already in these jurisdictions. Local, state and federal travel regulations and health guidelines are changing rapidly, and we want to be as responsive and supportive as possible should more changes occur.
  • Any student, faculty or staff member returning to the U.S. from any country determined by the Centers for Disease Control to be a Warning Level 3 (Avoid Nonessential Travel) will be asked to undergo quarantine at their permanent home residence for a minimum of 14 days prior to returning to campus. If undergoing quarantine at your permanent residence is not possible due to extraordinary circumstances, the university will provide temporary housing during the mandatory quarantine period. Affected individuals should contact the Office of Student Affairs at studentaffairs@marshall.edu.
  • The university is in close, regular communication with students currently abroad on exchange and other programs, regarding how to monitor and assess their current situations based on conditions in the country they are visiting.

About COVID-19

How is it spread?

People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. Therefore, it is important to stay more than 1 meter (3 feet) away from a person who is sick.

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment, although there have been fatal cases of COVID-19.

What is the treatment?

To date, there is no vaccine and no specific antiviral medicine to prevent or treat COVID-2019. However, those affected should receive care to relieve symptoms. People with serious illness should be hospitalized. Most patients recover thanks to supportive care.

Possible vaccines and some specific drug treatments are under investigation.

How can people protect themselves?

  • Regularly and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Maintain at least 3 feet distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth because viruses can be transmitted from surfaces to your body.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Dispose of the used tissue immediately.
  • Stay home if you feel unwell. For excused absences, students should contact the Office of Student Advocacy and Support.
  • If you are feeling sick, call your healthcare provider before seeking medical care.
  • Students who have recently traveled internationally, had exposure to a known or suspected case of COVID-19, and are experiencing fever, cough or shortness of breath, should contact Student Health Services at 304-691-1100. Faculty and staff should call their primary care provider or the Marshall Health hotline at 304-696-2900, particularly if you believe you have been exposed. There also are two local hospitals, and the emergency department of both are available 24/7.

Seasonal Flu Information

The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) recommends that everyone receive the seasonal flu vaccine. Emphasis is always placed on early vaccination of high-risk individuals. The flu season generally runs from October through March and sometimes in early April.

The seasonal influenza virus is spread mainly by person-to-person contact through droplets created by coughing or sneezing of infected people. The seasonal flu has a greater impact on young children, older people, and people with certain health conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart disease); these individuals are at high risk for serious complications.

Signs and symptoms of seasonal flu are similar to the common cold, however the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, headaches, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough and sore throat are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

For more information visit the CDC’s influenza web site.